Philip H. Montenigro

Subconcussive Load Effect & Trauma Profile for CTE: A Meta-analysis of New Trends [poster]

– Posted in: Abstracts & Posters

Title: A Subconcussive Load Effect & Trauma Profile for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Meta-analysis of New Trends
Authors: P Montenigro, C Cove, M Crowell, C Nowinski, C Cantu, R Stern
Publication Date - 2012
Journal Name: Poster presented at Boston University’s annual Medical Student Summer Research Symposium, Boston, MA
Location: The Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology The Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA

Click to enlarge the poster:

A Subconcussive Load Effect & Trauma Profile for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Meta-analysis of New Trends

A Subconcussive Load Effect & Trauma Profile for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Meta-analysis of New Trends

This poster received an Honorable Mention in the category of “Clinical Science Posters” for the 2012 **Serchuck Award

Description: Meta-analysis of autopsy confirmed CTE cases to analyze potential differences in symptom onset and time to death between case reports in football players and boxers. This analysis is based on a theoretical framework which suggests exposure difference to brain trauma relate to differences in disease onset and progression. For instance, boxers would be expected to have greater exposure to rotational forces transmitted to the brainstem-cerebellum (lateral chin impacts from a hook punch), whereas football players endure more frequent frontal forehead impacts (see accelerometer literature, impact location, linemen). Considering the vulnerability of the frontal lobes to injury, we hypothesised that football players would have a younger age at symptom onset, and a faster rate of progression than might be expected in boxers. The mean ages of death in CTE cases were 41.9 and 61.0 for football players and boxers, respectively (P<0.0001) supporting this hypothesis. The mean number of years from symptom onset to death was 7.7 and 18.9 for football players and boxers, respectively (P=0.007) supporting this hypothesis. It should be noted, however that the analysis is preliminary and unadjusted. Our results have important implications and do support our original hypothesis. Future longitudinal analysis in living players is required to establish the underlying etiology for the observed results.

**The Serchuck Award is given annually at the Medical Student Summer Research Symposium for outstanding research posters created by medical students at Boston University School of Medicine. Students who display posters are part of the Medical Student Summer Research Program that awards scholarships to students to undertake research at Boston University Medical Center (BUMC).
The award honors Jerry Serchuck, one of the longtime donors to the Medical Student Summer Research Program. Mr. Serchuck has given generously to the research program from its official establishment in 2000 when fifteen class-of-2003 students undertook research in various BUMC departments. The program continues to flourish as a direct result of his initial contribution and ongoing support. The first Serchuck Award was given in 2007.

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